logo biolab final2 withLOGOpe

 
 TEFAA LOGO HQ ENG 3 NEW 2017

Deli CK et al., 2017 (b). A Comparison of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage...

Field(s): Exercise Induced Inflammation, Pediatric Exercise Science

 

Citation: Deli, C. K., Fatouros, I. G., Paschalis, V., Georgakouli, K., Zalavras, A., Avloniti, A., . . . Jamurtas, A. Z. (2017). A Comparison of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage Following Maximal Eccentric Contractions in Men and Boys. Pediatr Exerc Sci, 1-26. doi:10.1123/pes.2016-0185

 

 

 

 

 

A Comparison of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage Following Maximal Eccentric Contractions in Men and Boys

Abstract

Purpose:

Research regarding exercise-induced muscle-damage mainly focuses on adults. The present study examined exercise-induced muscle-damage responses in adults compared to children.

Method:

Eleven healthy boys (10-12y) and 15 healthy men (18-45y) performed 5 sets of 15 maximal eccentric contractions of the knee extensors. Range of motion (ROM), delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) during squat and walking, and peak isometric, concentric and eccentric torque were assessed before, post-, 24, 48, 72, and 96h post-exercise. Creatine kinase (CK) activity was assessed prior to and 72h post-exercise.

Results:

Eccentric exercise resulted in DOMS during squat that persisted for up to 96h in men, and 48h in boys (p<.05), and DOMS during walking that persisted for up to 72h in men, and 48h in boys (p<.01). The ROM was lower in both age groups 48h post-exercise (p<.001). Isometric (p<.001), concentric (p<.01) and eccentric (p<.01) force decreased post-, and up to 48h post-exercise in men. Except for a reduction in isometric force immediately after exercise, no other changes occurred in boys’ isokinetic force. CK activity increased in men at 72h post-exercise compared to pre exercise levels (p=.05).

Conclusion:

Our data provide further confirmation that children are less susceptible to exercise-induced muscle damage compared to adults.